Robert A. Dodell, Attorney at Law - Serving Scottsdale, Tempe & Mesa, AZ - Feed https://www.azcrimlaw.com Robert A Dodell, Attorney at Law Fri, 28 Jun 2019 18:53:05 +0000 Tue, 16 Jul 2019 04:41:46 +0000 en-US Arizona Lawmakers Approve Ban on Cellphone Use While Driving https://www.azcrimlaw.com/dui-legal-defense/misdemeanor/arizona-lawmakers-approve-ban-on-cellphone-use-while-driving/ Fri, 28 Jun 2019 18:53:05 +0000 https://www.azcrimlaw.com/?p=1470 In April of this year, Arizona became the 48th state to prohibit the use of mobile phones and other handheld mobile devices while driving. The bill was signed on April 22, 2019 by Republican Governor Doug Ducey, which will give effect to a statewide ban on using handheld devices while driving starting January 2021. While police officers are not yet allowed to issue tickets to violators, they can already issue warnings. Once the law takes effect on the first day of January 2021, first-time violators will be issued tickets that will require them to pay a civil penalty from $75 to $149. Violators will have to pay a civil penalty between $150 and $250 for a second ticket. Want to make sure you’re well-informed of this new law? Here are some things you should know about the statewide cellphone ban for Arizona drivers.

Are You Allowed To Talk While Driving In Arizona?

The law specifically states that any kind of cellphone use—talking, texting, sending emails, accessing social media accounts, etc.—will be prohibited unless their devices are in hands-free mode and are activated by voice.

Here are the specifics:

  • It is prohibited to hold the phone in any way, including holding it up on the shoulder or supporting it with any body part.
  • Any text-based communication or activity, including emails, instant messaging, and texts is not allowed.
  • Recording or watching videos is not allowed.
  • It is also prohibited to take or view photos on a cellphone while driving.

The following information highlights exemptions:

  • Swiping mobile device screens to accept or make calls is allowed.
  • Talking on the phone is allowed when using an earpiece or any headphone device. Using a wrist-worn device is also allowed.
  • Voice-based communications are allowed (i.e. speakerphones, typing text through mobile voice function, etc.)
  • Using a built-in GPS device while driving is allowed.
  • Using handheld mobile devices are allowed while the vehicle is stopped. The vehicle can either be parked or stopped at a traffic light.
  • Using a handheld mobile device to call 911.
To be clear, this ban will apply not only to mobile phones but also to other portable wireless devices used for communication, such as tablets. Certain exemptions apply to officials who are responding to emergencies and to people who are in need of emergency help. The law does not include two-way radios, built-in devices, in-vehicle security devices, or navigation devices.

What About City Laws?

Even before the ban on cellphone use was approved, there were cities in Arizona that already prohibited the use of mobile phones while driving. Some of the cities that prohibited using handheld devices are El Mirage, Fountain Hills, Glendale, Phoenix, Surprise, Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community, and Tempe. These laws will remain in effect until the new state law replaces them in 2021.

What Other States Prohibit Texting While Driving?

For more than a decade, there were a number of proposed laws that sought to ban the use of mobile phones while driving. There was already an anti-distracted driving law in place in Arizona, but it didn’t specify the use of mobile handheld devices. Texting while driving was prohibited only for newer drivers, particularly teenagers. Now that Arizona has taken this step towards banning all cellphone use, there are only two remaining states that still don’t have a statewide texting ban for all drivers—Missouri and Montana. Using a mobile phone while driving is a serious safety issue and now a civil traffic offense.  Arizona has been added to the list of states that had already implemented a statewide ban. Although it is a civil traffic offense, this does not mean that a driver cannot be charged with a criminal offense when the mobile phone violation results in an accident or other serious misconduct.  If you have been charged with an offense, Robert A. Dodell, Attorney at Law is there to assist you through your troubles.    

Arizona Lawmakers Approve Ban on Cellphone Use While Driving was originally published on www.azcrimlaw.com/

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In April of this year, Arizona became the 48th state to prohibit the use of mobile phones and other handheld mobile devices while driving. The bill was signed on April 22, 2019 by Republican Governor Doug Ducey, which will give effect to a statewide ban on using handheld devices while driving starting January 2021. While police officers are not yet allowed to issue tickets to violators, they can already issue warnings. Once the law takes effect on the first day of January 2021, first-time violators will be issued tickets that will require them to pay a civil penalty from $75 to $149. Violators will have to pay a civil penalty between $150 and $250 for a second ticket. Want to make sure you’re well-informed of this new law? Here are some things you should know about the statewide cellphone ban for Arizona drivers.

Are You Allowed To Talk While Driving In Arizona?

The law specifically states that any kind of cellphone use—talking, texting, sending emails, accessing social media accounts, etc.—will be prohibited unless their devices are in hands-free mode and are activated by voice.

Here are the specifics:

  • It is prohibited to hold the phone in any way, including holding it up on the shoulder or supporting it with any body part.
  • Any text-based communication or activity, including emails, instant messaging, and texts is not allowed.
  • Recording or watching videos is not allowed.
  • It is also prohibited to take or view photos on a cellphone while driving.

The following information highlights exemptions:

  • Swiping mobile device screens to accept or make calls is allowed.
  • Talking on the phone is allowed when using an earpiece or any headphone device. Using a wrist-worn device is also allowed.
  • Voice-based communications are allowed (i.e. speakerphones, typing text through mobile voice function, etc.)
  • Using a built-in GPS device while driving is allowed.
  • Using handheld mobile devices are allowed while the vehicle is stopped. The vehicle can either be parked or stopped at a traffic light.
  • Using a handheld mobile device to call 911.
To be clear, this ban will apply not only to mobile phones but also to other portable wireless devices used for communication, such as tablets. Certain exemptions apply to officials who are responding to emergencies and to people who are in need of emergency help. The law does not include two-way radios, built-in devices, in-vehicle security devices, or navigation devices.

What About City Laws?

Even before the ban on cellphone use was approved, there were cities in Arizona that already prohibited the use of mobile phones while driving. Some of the cities that prohibited using handheld devices are El Mirage, Fountain Hills, Glendale, Phoenix, Surprise, Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community, and Tempe. These laws will remain in effect until the new state law replaces them in 2021.

What Other States Prohibit Texting While Driving?

For more than a decade, there were a number of proposed laws that sought to ban the use of mobile phones while driving. There was already an anti-distracted driving law in place in Arizona, but it didn’t specify the use of mobile handheld devices. Texting while driving was prohibited only for newer drivers, particularly teenagers. Now that Arizona has taken this step towards banning all cellphone use, there are only two remaining states that still don’t have a statewide texting ban for all drivers—Missouri and Montana. Using a mobile phone while driving is a serious safety issue and now a civil traffic offense.  Arizona has been added to the list of states that had already implemented a statewide ban. Although it is a civil traffic offense, this does not mean that a driver cannot be charged with a criminal offense when the mobile phone violation results in an accident or other serious misconduct.  If you have been charged with an offense, Robert A. Dodell, Attorney at Law is there to assist you through your troubles.    

Arizona Lawmakers Approve Ban on Cellphone Use While Driving was originally published on www.azcrimlaw.com/

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How Can I Get My License Back After a DUI? https://www.azcrimlaw.com/dui-legal-defense/felony/how-can-i-get-my-license-back-after-a-dui/ Sun, 23 Jun 2019 18:57:57 +0000 https://www.azcrimlaw.com/?p=1477 Partying is not a crime. However, drinking and driving is not a good combination. In the US, it is estimated that 28 people die every day from car crashes caused by alcohol consumption. This roughly translates to one person dying every 51 minutes, according to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA). The statistics are bad enough to understand why driving while intoxicated is strictly enforced and why the law requires the suspension of a driving privileges. Drug Use Lead to a DUI

What Is DUI?

DUI means driving under the influence. Depending on which state, it may be called other names such as Driving While Intoxicated or Impaired (DWI), Operating Under the Influence (OUI), or Impaired Driving.

How Do You Get Arrested For DUI?

Most of the people who drive under the influence of alcohol or other substances violate speed limits or drive erratically. Once a police officer spots an offending vehicle, the officer trails that vehicle and signals to the driver to pull over. Once pulled over, they question the driver. If driver is suspected to be intoxicated, he or she is subject to a blood alcohol content (BAC) test. The legal limit for BAC in Arizona is 0.08 percent, though even smaller percentages may already impair a person’s ability to drive. In fact, a 2015 report from NHTSA found that 1,809 people were killed in car crashes related to alcohol intoxication where the drivers’ BAC was less than 0.08 percent. If the person is found to over the BAC legal limit, his or her driver’s license will be taken away and he or she will be charged with a crime. Even if a driver refuses to get his BAC tested, the officer will likely get a warrant for a blood test and driver’s license and driving privileges would still be suspended anyway. Upon conviction, a person may be sentenced to receive punishment —monetary fine, community service, or jail / prison. This depends on the severity of the incident and whether or not the person being convicted is a first-time or repeat offender.

How to Get Back Your License

Once a DUI offender gets released, their license isn’t immediately reinstated. They may have to undergo several steps depending on which state they’re in. For first-time DUI offenders, police officers will replace the offender’s license with a temporary one. The offender must  request a hearing from the Motor Vehicle Department or the license will be suspended in 15 days.The temporary license will be go until the ruling from the administrative law judge of the validity of the suspension.  Note that failure to request a hearing will lead to a suspension of the driver’s license, after the 15 day grace period. Suspension of a driver’s license varies in time.  It may last from 3 to 12 months depending on several factors: (1) the level of intoxication of the driver, (2) whether or not the driver has had previous DUIs, and (3) whether there was a refusal to take the blood test. There may be multiple steps to follow for people to get their license back after a DUI.  Each case is different. Basically, the person will be required to complete all the requirements set forth by the Motor Vehicle Department, which could include payment of any fines that caused a license to be suspended; proof of insurance from the vehicle; an ignition interlock device; completion of an alcohol rehabilitation program; and reinstatement fees. Note that alcohol rehabilitation programs vary depending on the level of intoxication at which the driver was arrested, alcohol history and prior DUI history.  It could range anywhere from attending an alcohol safety education for a several hours to signing up and committing to a long term alcohol rehabilitation and detox program. This may seem like a strict form of punishment, but it’s a good way to remind people to drink responsibly to avoid consequences that result from a DUI.

When You May Need To Hire A Lawyer

Scottsdale Courts take DUIs seriously, particularly because it often proves fatal to other motorists. Being convicted of a DUI means potentially losing your license, paying a large fine, or sometimes serving time in jail or prison. An experienced DUI lawyer may not guarantee that your DUI case is dismissed, but he or she could play a role in gaining you a reduced sentence. In case you need one at some point, Robert A. Dodell, Attorney at Law is an excellent choice.    

The following article How Can I Get My License Back After a DUI? is courtesy of assistance and help from Robert Dodell

Robert Dodell Law Offices

10601 N Hayden Rd, #I-103

Scottsdale, AZ 85260

(480) 860-4321

https://goo.gl/maps/diwY4pu8X5m

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Partying is not a crime. However, drinking and driving is not a good combination. In the US, it is estimated that 28 people die every day from car crashes caused by alcohol consumption. This roughly translates to one person dying every 51 minutes, according to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA). The statistics are bad enough to understand why driving while intoxicated is strictly enforced and why the law requires the suspension of a driving privileges. Drug Use Lead to a DUI

What Is DUI?

DUI means driving under the influence. Depending on which state, it may be called other names such as Driving While Intoxicated or Impaired (DWI), Operating Under the Influence (OUI), or Impaired Driving.

How Do You Get Arrested For DUI?

Most of the people who drive under the influence of alcohol or other substances violate speed limits or drive erratically. Once a police officer spots an offending vehicle, the officer trails that vehicle and signals to the driver to pull over. Once pulled over, they question the driver. If driver is suspected to be intoxicated, he or she is subject to a blood alcohol content (BAC) test. The legal limit for BAC in Arizona is 0.08 percent, though even smaller percentages may already impair a person’s ability to drive. In fact, a 2015 report from NHTSA found that 1,809 people were killed in car crashes related to alcohol intoxication where the drivers’ BAC was less than 0.08 percent. If the person is found to over the BAC legal limit, his or her driver’s license will be taken away and he or she will be charged with a crime. Even if a driver refuses to get his BAC tested, the officer will likely get a warrant for a blood test and driver’s license and driving privileges would still be suspended anyway. Upon conviction, a person may be sentenced to receive punishment —monetary fine, community service, or jail / prison. This depends on the severity of the incident and whether or not the person being convicted is a first-time or repeat offender.

How to Get Back Your License

Once a DUI offender gets released, their license isn’t immediately reinstated. They may have to undergo several steps depending on which state they’re in. For first-time DUI offenders, police officers will replace the offender’s license with a temporary one. The offender must  request a hearing from the Motor Vehicle Department or the license will be suspended in 15 days.The temporary license will be go until the ruling from the administrative law judge of the validity of the suspension.  Note that failure to request a hearing will lead to a suspension of the driver’s license, after the 15 day grace period. Suspension of a driver’s license varies in time.  It may last from 3 to 12 months depending on several factors: (1) the level of intoxication of the driver, (2) whether or not the driver has had previous DUIs, and (3) whether there was a refusal to take the blood test. There may be multiple steps to follow for people to get their license back after a DUI.  Each case is different. Basically, the person will be required to complete all the requirements set forth by the Motor Vehicle Department, which could include payment of any fines that caused a license to be suspended; proof of insurance from the vehicle; an ignition interlock device; completion of an alcohol rehabilitation program; and reinstatement fees. Note that alcohol rehabilitation programs vary depending on the level of intoxication at which the driver was arrested, alcohol history and prior DUI history.  It could range anywhere from attending an alcohol safety education for a several hours to signing up and committing to a long term alcohol rehabilitation and detox program. This may seem like a strict form of punishment, but it’s a good way to remind people to drink responsibly to avoid consequences that result from a DUI.

When You May Need To Hire A Lawyer

Scottsdale Courts take DUIs seriously, particularly because it often proves fatal to other motorists. Being convicted of a DUI means potentially losing your license, paying a large fine, or sometimes serving time in jail or prison. An experienced DUI lawyer may not guarantee that your DUI case is dismissed, but he or she could play a role in gaining you a reduced sentence. In case you need one at some point, Robert A. Dodell, Attorney at Law is an excellent choice.    

The following article How Can I Get My License Back After a DUI? is courtesy of assistance and help from Robert Dodell

Robert Dodell Law Offices

10601 N Hayden Rd, #I-103

Scottsdale, AZ 85260

(480) 860-4321

https://goo.gl/maps/diwY4pu8X5m

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When You May Want to Waive Your Right to a Jury Trial https://www.azcrimlaw.com/criminal-legal-defense/when-you-may-want-to-waive-your-right-to-a-jury-trial/ Tue, 11 Jun 2019 01:57:56 +0000 https://www.azcrimlaw.com/?p=1459 The US Constitution recognizes and protects the right of every citizen to a jury trial (Art III, Sec. 2, and the Sixth Amendment). But, you can also waive your right for a jury trial if you prefer a bench trial, where only the judge decides on the verdict. In general, people would not want to waive their right to have a jury trial. But, there may be cases when that will be the best option to take.

When to Waive Your Right to a Trial by Jury

According to the courts, any person can waive his or her right to a trial by jury in a voluntary and intelligent manner.  A conviction will discarded if it is shown that a defendant was not informed clearly of the difference between a jury and bench trial. Thus, you must show the court that you are aware of the implications of your actions if you are waiving your right to a trial by jury. For instance, you may need to confirm your understanding that a jury will be composed of a dozen people from your community. You may also need to confirm that you understand your right (through your lawyer) to participate in selecting the members of the jury, and that all the jurors must be unanimous in convicting you for the crime. If you waive your right, the decision on your innocence or guilt will be in the hands of the judge. Once you convince the court that you have full understanding of what you’re doing, it will be then be up to the prosecutor to agree to have a bench trial instead. There are various reasons you may consider waiving your right to be tried by a jury of your peers. Some wish to waive the jury trial because they believe that the jury will most likely not be sympathetic or compassionate; some believe the judge will follow the law more closely and not be swayed by emotion and then some just feel uncomfortable with a jury.  Whatever the reason, this should be fully discussed with the attorney before you decide whether to waive the right to a jury trial.

Waiving Your Right to Be Tried by a Jury

As mentioned, the court will only allow you to waive your right in a voluntary and intelligent manner. Likewise, the court will show that you have been well-informed about the differences between a bench trial and jury trial.  The prosecutor must also agree. If he disagrees, the trial by jury will proceed, as the State has the same right to a jury trial as the defendant.

When considering waiving a jury trial for your criminal case in Arizona, contact Robert A. Dodell, Attorney At Law to help you plan your next move. Coming up with a sound strategy is perhaps the hardest part of defending a criminal case. After all, your freedom and reputation are at stake. Having an experienced and reputable lawyer by your side can help you achieve the best possible outcome.

When You May Want to Waive Your Right to a Jury Trial Read more on: Robert Dodell Law Offices

Robert Dodell

10601 N Hayden Rd, #I-103

Scottsdale, AZ 85260

(480) 860-4321

https://goo.gl/okuXui

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The US Constitution recognizes and protects the right of every citizen to a jury trial (Art III, Sec. 2, and the Sixth Amendment). But, you can also waive your right for a jury trial if you prefer a bench trial, where only the judge decides on the verdict. In general, people would not want to waive their right to have a jury trial. But, there may be cases when that will be the best option to take.

When to Waive Your Right to a Trial by Jury

According to the courts, any person can waive his or her right to a trial by jury in a voluntary and intelligent manner.  A conviction will discarded if it is shown that a defendant was not informed clearly of the difference between a jury and bench trial. Thus, you must show the court that you are aware of the implications of your actions if you are waiving your right to a trial by jury. For instance, you may need to confirm your understanding that a jury will be composed of a dozen people from your community. You may also need to confirm that you understand your right (through your lawyer) to participate in selecting the members of the jury, and that all the jurors must be unanimous in convicting you for the crime. If you waive your right, the decision on your innocence or guilt will be in the hands of the judge. Once you convince the court that you have full understanding of what you’re doing, it will be then be up to the prosecutor to agree to have a bench trial instead. There are various reasons you may consider waiving your right to be tried by a jury of your peers. Some wish to waive the jury trial because they believe that the jury will most likely not be sympathetic or compassionate; some believe the judge will follow the law more closely and not be swayed by emotion and then some just feel uncomfortable with a jury.  Whatever the reason, this should be fully discussed with the attorney before you decide whether to waive the right to a jury trial.

Waiving Your Right to Be Tried by a Jury

As mentioned, the court will only allow you to waive your right in a voluntary and intelligent manner. Likewise, the court will show that you have been well-informed about the differences between a bench trial and jury trial.  The prosecutor must also agree. If he disagrees, the trial by jury will proceed, as the State has the same right to a jury trial as the defendant.

When considering waiving a jury trial for your criminal case in Arizona, contact Robert A. Dodell, Attorney At Law to help you plan your next move. Coming up with a sound strategy is perhaps the hardest part of defending a criminal case. After all, your freedom and reputation are at stake. Having an experienced and reputable lawyer by your side can help you achieve the best possible outcome.

When You May Want to Waive Your Right to a Jury Trial Read more on: Robert Dodell Law Offices

Robert Dodell

10601 N Hayden Rd, #I-103

Scottsdale, AZ 85260

(480) 860-4321

https://goo.gl/okuXui

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Arizona Helping Hands, Foster Care and Adoption https://www.azcrimlaw.com/adoptions/juvenile-dependency/arizona-helping-hands-foster-care-and-adoption/ Wed, 29 May 2019 11:46:24 +0000 https://www.azcrimlaw.com/?p=1451 “No one is useless in this world who lightens the burdens of another.” With that powerful quote in mind from Charles Dickens, The Law Office of Robert A. Dodell and staff toured Arizona Helping Hands, a non-profit organization that helps families with children in foster care.  President & CEO, Dan Shufelt, kindly escorted us through their facility. Law book and wooden judges gavel on table in a courtroom or law enforcement office. Lawyer Hands holding business card with text Foster Care Our law office works on multiple adoptions a year for families who are either foster parents or relative or non-relative placements of children who are wards of the court and in the legal custody of the Department of Child Safety (DCS). It’s fulfilling to assist bringing families together via adoption, but we wanted to take it one step further and make sure these selfless families knew about organizations like Arizona Helping Hands.   So, what does Arizona Helping Hands help with?  Well, it seems like everything!   If a foster family needs a bed or crib for a child, Arizona Helping Hands will provide one at no cost. Donations from the public, primarily through the Arizona foster care tax credit program have provided funding to supply 3,338 beds in 2018 alone to children in foster care. But that’s not all! Arizona Helping Hands also assists with clothing, diapers, books, etc., for foster families and DCS placements in need. These families need only bring their Notice to Provider from DCS, fill out the Arizona Helping Hands’ “in need” application or call for a service appointment for this assistance.  https://www.azhelpinghands.org/basic-2/   Our tour of the Arizona Helping Hands facility blew us away. The quiet and modest office in front completely belied the magic in back. The large warehouse, where donations of all kinds are stored in neatly packed aisles, was abuzz with activity and excitement. Volunteers lined up, assembly-style, chatted and laughed as they efficiently packed goods at long tables between the aisles. Some volunteers packed backpacks filled with school supplies for kids transferring to a new school. Over 6,500 backpacks were filled last year with age-appropriate supplies and given to foster children as the result of requests made by DCS placements, court appointed special advocates (CASA’s), DCS and tribal caseworkers.   Other volunteers packed personal care kits filled with basic toiletries such as shampoo, soap, toothbrushes, toothpaste, etc., for foster kids frequently placed in care with literally nothing but the clothes on their backs. It’s harder still, when you’ve been removed from the only family you’ve ever known and it’s your birthday. Arizona Helping Hands thought of that too. We watched in awe as personalized birthday gift bags for kids in DCS care were swiftly assembled with gift-wrapped goodies including toys, books and other treats. Sometimes even a bicycle accompanies the birthday gift bag!  Families can apply online for a birthday donation at https://www.azhelpinghands.org/birthday-dreams/ 2-4 weeks in advance of the child’s birthday. Of course, Arizona Helping Hands does not stop at birthdays; holiday toy drives are a must as well. Over 30,000 toys were donated last year! https://www.azhelpinghands.org/toydrive/   Whether you’re a DCS placement in need or you want to donate your time, goods or money to Arizona Helping Hands, reach out to them. They’re wonderfully organized and accomplish so much with just over 7% overhead and virtually no government support. Aside from corporate donations, most of the support is from individual donations via the Foster Care tax credit program, where a taxpayer receives a dollar-for-dollar tax credit against their Arizona State income tax liability for annual contributions. The credit is $1000 for a married couple or $500 for a single person.  https://www.azhelpinghands.org/aztaxcredit-html/ It is a wonder thing when you have a foster child in your home, or when you give of yourself to an organization that lightens a foster child’s burden. Check out how the Robert A. Dodell adoption team can help you and your family.

Arizona Helping Hands, Foster Care and Adoption is courtesy of Post by Robert Dodell Attorney

Law Offices of Robert A. Dodell

10601 N Hayden Rd, #I-103

Scottsdale, AZ 85260

(480) 860-4321

https://goo.gl/maps/diwY4pu8X5m

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“No one is useless in this world who lightens the burdens of another.” With that powerful quote in mind from Charles Dickens, The Law Office of Robert A. Dodell and staff toured Arizona Helping Hands, a non-profit organization that helps families with children in foster care.  President & CEO, Dan Shufelt, kindly escorted us through their facility. Law book and wooden judges gavel on table in a courtroom or law enforcement office. Lawyer Hands holding business card with text Foster Care Our law office works on multiple adoptions a year for families who are either foster parents or relative or non-relative placements of children who are wards of the court and in the legal custody of the Department of Child Safety (DCS). It’s fulfilling to assist bringing families together via adoption, but we wanted to take it one step further and make sure these selfless families knew about organizations like Arizona Helping Hands.   So, what does Arizona Helping Hands help with?  Well, it seems like everything!   If a foster family needs a bed or crib for a child, Arizona Helping Hands will provide one at no cost. Donations from the public, primarily through the Arizona foster care tax credit program have provided funding to supply 3,338 beds in 2018 alone to children in foster care. But that’s not all! Arizona Helping Hands also assists with clothing, diapers, books, etc., for foster families and DCS placements in need. These families need only bring their Notice to Provider from DCS, fill out the Arizona Helping Hands’ “in need” application or call for a service appointment for this assistance.  https://www.azhelpinghands.org/basic-2/   Our tour of the Arizona Helping Hands facility blew us away. The quiet and modest office in front completely belied the magic in back. The large warehouse, where donations of all kinds are stored in neatly packed aisles, was abuzz with activity and excitement. Volunteers lined up, assembly-style, chatted and laughed as they efficiently packed goods at long tables between the aisles. Some volunteers packed backpacks filled with school supplies for kids transferring to a new school. Over 6,500 backpacks were filled last year with age-appropriate supplies and given to foster children as the result of requests made by DCS placements, court appointed special advocates (CASA’s), DCS and tribal caseworkers.   Other volunteers packed personal care kits filled with basic toiletries such as shampoo, soap, toothbrushes, toothpaste, etc., for foster kids frequently placed in care with literally nothing but the clothes on their backs. It’s harder still, when you’ve been removed from the only family you’ve ever known and it’s your birthday. Arizona Helping Hands thought of that too. We watched in awe as personalized birthday gift bags for kids in DCS care were swiftly assembled with gift-wrapped goodies including toys, books and other treats. Sometimes even a bicycle accompanies the birthday gift bag!  Families can apply online for a birthday donation at https://www.azhelpinghands.org/birthday-dreams/ 2-4 weeks in advance of the child’s birthday. Of course, Arizona Helping Hands does not stop at birthdays; holiday toy drives are a must as well. Over 30,000 toys were donated last year! https://www.azhelpinghands.org/toydrive/   Whether you’re a DCS placement in need or you want to donate your time, goods or money to Arizona Helping Hands, reach out to them. They’re wonderfully organized and accomplish so much with just over 7% overhead and virtually no government support. Aside from corporate donations, most of the support is from individual donations via the Foster Care tax credit program, where a taxpayer receives a dollar-for-dollar tax credit against their Arizona State income tax liability for annual contributions. The credit is $1000 for a married couple or $500 for a single person.  https://www.azhelpinghands.org/aztaxcredit-html/ It is a wonder thing when you have a foster child in your home, or when you give of yourself to an organization that lightens a foster child’s burden. Check out how the Robert A. Dodell adoption team can help you and your family.

Arizona Helping Hands, Foster Care and Adoption is courtesy of Post by Robert Dodell Attorney

Law Offices of Robert A. Dodell

10601 N Hayden Rd, #I-103

Scottsdale, AZ 85260

(480) 860-4321

https://goo.gl/maps/diwY4pu8X5m

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10 Tips to Help You Decide What Criminal Defense Law Firm to Hire https://www.azcrimlaw.com/criminal-legal-defense/10-tips-to-help-you-decide-what-criminal-defense-law-firm-to-hire/ Sat, 18 May 2019 22:22:09 +0000 https://www.azcrimlaw.com/?p=1392

Tips to Help You Find an Experienced Criminal Defense to Help You

An experienced and reputable criminal lawyer can help you face your accusers – whether you’re facing charges for DUI, theft or any other crime. But, finding the right criminal defense lawyer to work with can be difficult. Having said that, here are 10 tips that will help you decide which criminal defense law firm to work with.
  1. Go for an experienced law firm. – Your prospective lawyer must be familiar with the specific type of crime you are charged with. It is not inappropriate to ask for a lawyer’s experience in handling particular criminal cases if you are unsure. See how your prospective lawyer fares against other lawyers in terms of experience, achievements, and recognition's, among others.
  2. Check the lawyer for any disciplinary action from the State Bar of Arizona (www.azbar.org).  Just as you would not want a doctor who has been disciplined by the licensing agency, neither should you want an lawyer who has been disciplined.
  3. The lawyer must have experience in local courts. – Consider hiring a law firm that has considerable experience in the local court where your case is filed. Because every court has unique staff and procedures, it would be to your advantage if your attorney is familiar with the particular court.
  4. Read testimonials and reviews from past clients. – You can ask the lawyer where you can obtain this information. You can also visit review sites for the attorney on Google, Avvo and Yelp to learn what previous clients think about the law firm. You want to find a lawyer that has a good amount of positive reviews from past clients.
  5. Find a law firm you can easily communicate with. – Communication between lawyer and client is very important in criminal cases. Thus, before making a final choice, make sure you can communicate with your lawyer at all times you need to. Is the attorney accessible?  Ask the hours you can call the firm, and if they have an attorney on call who can attend to your emergency needs.
  6. Determine if you will be defended by a lawyer or a team of lawyers. – You’re in good hands if you have a single attorney representing you.  You will have the attention of one attorney, who will know all the aspects of your case and you will not be handed off to someone else. Hiring a single attorney also provides the assurance that there will be a lawyer on top of your case at all times.
  7. Your first impression is an indication of how things are. – Consider your experience when calling the law firm for the first time. The ideal lawyer must be respectful and responsive to your needs. If you had difficulty communicating with the lawyer now, how much more when you are already working together in your case?
  8. Be ready to tell your version of what happened. – Your version of the story is crucial in the evaluation of your criminal case. This is why an experienced defense attorney will ask you to prepare and do your homework. You need to relate the details of what happened leading to your arrest, as well as provide potential witnesses that can help your case.
  9. Don’t rely on guarantees. – No reputable lawyer would give you a guarantee on the outcome of your case. Anyone facing a criminal charge is likely worried and afraid. There are lawyers who will take advantage of your vulnerability by lying and promising specific results. The truth is, no one can guarantee the outcome of any case. Many factors will come into play as the case goes through the system. Guaranteeing results is unethical.
  10. Compare rates in writing. – Make sure to clarify how your prospective law firm charges their clients. Bear in mind that the most expensive firm doesn’t mean they are the best for your case. On the other hand, a firm that charges a very low fee may lack the experience you need. Ask for written quotes, then compare. Clarify how the fees work to make sure that you won’t be paying more than what you agreed to.
Follow the tips provided in this post to help make sure that you get the best criminal defense possible for your case. If you or any of your loved ones is facing a criminal charge in Arizona, contact Robert A. Dodell, Criminal Lawyer and find out how we can help.    

The post 10 Tips to Help You Decide What Criminal Defense Law Firm to Hire was first published on Choose Robert Dodell Law Offices

Robert A. Dodell, Attorney at Law - Serving Scottsdale, Tempe & Mesa, AZ

10601 N Hayden Rd, #I-103

Scottsdale, AZ 85260

(480) 860-4321

https://goo.gl/maps/diwY4pu8X5m

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Tips to Help You Find an Experienced Criminal Defense to Help You

An experienced and reputable criminal lawyer can help you face your accusers – whether you’re facing charges for DUI, theft or any other crime. But, finding the right criminal defense lawyer to work with can be difficult. Having said that, here are 10 tips that will help you decide which criminal defense law firm to work with.
  1. Go for an experienced law firm. – Your prospective lawyer must be familiar with the specific type of crime you are charged with. It is not inappropriate to ask for a lawyer’s experience in handling particular criminal cases if you are unsure. See how your prospective lawyer fares against other lawyers in terms of experience, achievements, and recognition's, among others.
  2. Check the lawyer for any disciplinary action from the State Bar of Arizona (www.azbar.org).  Just as you would not want a doctor who has been disciplined by the licensing agency, neither should you want an lawyer who has been disciplined.
  3. The lawyer must have experience in local courts. – Consider hiring a law firm that has considerable experience in the local court where your case is filed. Because every court has unique staff and procedures, it would be to your advantage if your attorney is familiar with the particular court.
  4. Read testimonials and reviews from past clients. – You can ask the lawyer where you can obtain this information. You can also visit review sites for the attorney on Google, Avvo and Yelp to learn what previous clients think about the law firm. You want to find a lawyer that has a good amount of positive reviews from past clients.
  5. Find a law firm you can easily communicate with. – Communication between lawyer and client is very important in criminal cases. Thus, before making a final choice, make sure you can communicate with your lawyer at all times you need to. Is the attorney accessible?  Ask the hours you can call the firm, and if they have an attorney on call who can attend to your emergency needs.
  6. Determine if you will be defended by a lawyer or a team of lawyers. – You’re in good hands if you have a single attorney representing you.  You will have the attention of one attorney, who will know all the aspects of your case and you will not be handed off to someone else. Hiring a single attorney also provides the assurance that there will be a lawyer on top of your case at all times.
  7. Your first impression is an indication of how things are. – Consider your experience when calling the law firm for the first time. The ideal lawyer must be respectful and responsive to your needs. If you had difficulty communicating with the lawyer now, how much more when you are already working together in your case?
  8. Be ready to tell your version of what happened. – Your version of the story is crucial in the evaluation of your criminal case. This is why an experienced defense attorney will ask you to prepare and do your homework. You need to relate the details of what happened leading to your arrest, as well as provide potential witnesses that can help your case.
  9. Don’t rely on guarantees. – No reputable lawyer would give you a guarantee on the outcome of your case. Anyone facing a criminal charge is likely worried and afraid. There are lawyers who will take advantage of your vulnerability by lying and promising specific results. The truth is, no one can guarantee the outcome of any case. Many factors will come into play as the case goes through the system. Guaranteeing results is unethical.
  10. Compare rates in writing. – Make sure to clarify how your prospective law firm charges their clients. Bear in mind that the most expensive firm doesn’t mean they are the best for your case. On the other hand, a firm that charges a very low fee may lack the experience you need. Ask for written quotes, then compare. Clarify how the fees work to make sure that you won’t be paying more than what you agreed to.
Follow the tips provided in this post to help make sure that you get the best criminal defense possible for your case. If you or any of your loved ones is facing a criminal charge in Arizona, contact Robert A. Dodell, Criminal Lawyer and find out how we can help.    

The post 10 Tips to Help You Decide What Criminal Defense Law Firm to Hire was first published on Choose Robert Dodell Law Offices

Robert A. Dodell, Attorney at Law - Serving Scottsdale, Tempe & Mesa, AZ

10601 N Hayden Rd, #I-103

Scottsdale, AZ 85260

(480) 860-4321

https://goo.gl/maps/diwY4pu8X5m

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