Robert A. Dodell, Attorney at Law - Serving Scottsdale, Tempe & Mesa, AZ - Feed https://www.azcrimlaw.com Robert A Dodell, Attorney at Law Tue, 21 May 2019 07:15:29 +0000 Sat, 25 May 2019 04:45:15 +0000 en-US 10 Tips to Help You Decide What Criminal Defense Law Firm to Hire https://www.azcrimlaw.com/criminal-legal-defense/10-tips-to-help-you-decide-what-criminal-defense-law-firm-to-hire/ Sat, 18 May 2019 22:22:09 +0000 https://www.azcrimlaw.com/?p=1392

Tips to Help You Find an Experienced Criminal Defense to Help You

An experienced and reputable criminal lawyer can help you face your accusers – whether you’re facing charges for DUI, theft or any other crime. But, finding the right criminal defense lawyer to work with can be difficult. Having said that, here are 10 tips that will help you decide which criminal defense law firm to work with.
  1. Go for an experienced law firm. – Your prospective lawyer must be familiar with the specific type of crime you are charged with. It is not inappropriate to ask for a lawyer’s experience in handling particular criminal cases if you are unsure. See how your prospective lawyer fares against other lawyers in terms of experience, achievements, and recognition's, among others.
  2. Check the lawyer for any disciplinary action from the State Bar of Arizona (www.azbar.org).  Just as you would not want a doctor who has been disciplined by the licensing agency, neither should you want an lawyer who has been disciplined.
  3. The lawyer must have experience in local courts. – Consider hiring a law firm that has considerable experience in the local court where your case is filed. Because every court has unique staff and procedures, it would be to your advantage if your attorney is familiar with the particular court.
  4. Read testimonials and reviews from past clients. – You can ask the lawyer where you can obtain this information. You can also visit review sites for the attorney on Google, Avvo and Yelp to learn what previous clients think about the law firm. You want to find a lawyer that has a good amount of positive reviews from past clients.
  5. Find a law firm you can easily communicate with. – Communication between lawyer and client is very important in criminal cases. Thus, before making a final choice, make sure you can communicate with your lawyer at all times you need to. Is the attorney accessible?  Ask the hours you can call the firm, and if they have an attorney on call who can attend to your emergency needs.
  6. Determine if you will be defended by a lawyer or a team of lawyers. – You’re in good hands if you have a single attorney representing you.  You will have the attention of one attorney, who will know all the aspects of your case and you will not be handed off to someone else. Hiring a single attorney also provides the assurance that there will be a lawyer on top of your case at all times.
  7. Your first impression is an indication of how things are. – Consider your experience when calling the law firm for the first time. The ideal lawyer must be respectful and responsive to your needs. If you had difficulty communicating with the lawyer now, how much more when you are already working together in your case?
  8. Be ready to tell your version of what happened. – Your version of the story is crucial in the evaluation of your criminal case. This is why an experienced defense attorney will ask you to prepare and do your homework. You need to relate the details of what happened leading to your arrest, as well as provide potential witnesses that can help your case.
  9. Don’t rely on guarantees. – No reputable lawyer would give you a guarantee on the outcome of your case. Anyone facing a criminal charge is likely worried and afraid. There are lawyers who will take advantage of your vulnerability by lying and promising specific results. The truth is, no one can guarantee the outcome of any case. Many factors will come into play as the case goes through the system. Guaranteeing results is unethical.
  10. Compare rates in writing. – Make sure to clarify how your prospective law firm charges their clients. Bear in mind that the most expensive firm doesn’t mean they are the best for your case. On the other hand, a firm that charges a very low fee may lack the experience you need. Ask for written quotes, then compare. Clarify how the fees work to make sure that you won’t be paying more than what you agreed to.
Follow the tips provided in this post to help make sure that you get the best criminal defense possible for your case. If you or any of your loved ones is facing a criminal charge in Arizona, contact Robert A. Dodell, Criminal Lawyer and find out how we can help.    

10 Tips to Help You Decide What Criminal Defense Law Firm to Hire is available on Robert A. Dodell

Law Offices of Robert A. Dodell

10601 N Hayden Rd, #I-103

Scottsdale, AZ 85260

(480) 860-4321

https://goo.gl/okuXui

]]>

Tips to Help You Find an Experienced Criminal Defense to Help You

An experienced and reputable criminal lawyer can help you face your accusers – whether you’re facing charges for DUI, theft or any other crime. But, finding the right criminal defense lawyer to work with can be difficult. Having said that, here are 10 tips that will help you decide which criminal defense law firm to work with.
  1. Go for an experienced law firm. – Your prospective lawyer must be familiar with the specific type of crime you are charged with. It is not inappropriate to ask for a lawyer’s experience in handling particular criminal cases if you are unsure. See how your prospective lawyer fares against other lawyers in terms of experience, achievements, and recognition's, among others.
  2. Check the lawyer for any disciplinary action from the State Bar of Arizona (www.azbar.org).  Just as you would not want a doctor who has been disciplined by the licensing agency, neither should you want an lawyer who has been disciplined.
  3. The lawyer must have experience in local courts. – Consider hiring a law firm that has considerable experience in the local court where your case is filed. Because every court has unique staff and procedures, it would be to your advantage if your attorney is familiar with the particular court.
  4. Read testimonials and reviews from past clients. – You can ask the lawyer where you can obtain this information. You can also visit review sites for the attorney on Google, Avvo and Yelp to learn what previous clients think about the law firm. You want to find a lawyer that has a good amount of positive reviews from past clients.
  5. Find a law firm you can easily communicate with. – Communication between lawyer and client is very important in criminal cases. Thus, before making a final choice, make sure you can communicate with your lawyer at all times you need to. Is the attorney accessible?  Ask the hours you can call the firm, and if they have an attorney on call who can attend to your emergency needs.
  6. Determine if you will be defended by a lawyer or a team of lawyers. – You’re in good hands if you have a single attorney representing you.  You will have the attention of one attorney, who will know all the aspects of your case and you will not be handed off to someone else. Hiring a single attorney also provides the assurance that there will be a lawyer on top of your case at all times.
  7. Your first impression is an indication of how things are. – Consider your experience when calling the law firm for the first time. The ideal lawyer must be respectful and responsive to your needs. If you had difficulty communicating with the lawyer now, how much more when you are already working together in your case?
  8. Be ready to tell your version of what happened. – Your version of the story is crucial in the evaluation of your criminal case. This is why an experienced defense attorney will ask you to prepare and do your homework. You need to relate the details of what happened leading to your arrest, as well as provide potential witnesses that can help your case.
  9. Don’t rely on guarantees. – No reputable lawyer would give you a guarantee on the outcome of your case. Anyone facing a criminal charge is likely worried and afraid. There are lawyers who will take advantage of your vulnerability by lying and promising specific results. The truth is, no one can guarantee the outcome of any case. Many factors will come into play as the case goes through the system. Guaranteeing results is unethical.
  10. Compare rates in writing. – Make sure to clarify how your prospective law firm charges their clients. Bear in mind that the most expensive firm doesn’t mean they are the best for your case. On the other hand, a firm that charges a very low fee may lack the experience you need. Ask for written quotes, then compare. Clarify how the fees work to make sure that you won’t be paying more than what you agreed to.
Follow the tips provided in this post to help make sure that you get the best criminal defense possible for your case. If you or any of your loved ones is facing a criminal charge in Arizona, contact Robert A. Dodell, Criminal Lawyer and find out how we can help.    

10 Tips to Help You Decide What Criminal Defense Law Firm to Hire is available on Robert A. Dodell

Law Offices of Robert A. Dodell

10601 N Hayden Rd, #I-103

Scottsdale, AZ 85260

(480) 860-4321

https://goo.gl/okuXui

]]>
What Are the Common Crime Defenses in Arizona? https://www.azcrimlaw.com/criminal-legal-defense/criminal-damage/what-are-the-common-crime-defenses-in-arizona/ Thu, 02 May 2019 10:10:44 +0000 https://www.azcrimlaw.com/?p=1411 Every American has a constitutional right to be present in court for criminal charges. So, if you have to face a judge, you should get an attorney to guide and help you. In addition, you must educate and familiarize yourself with regard to the common defenses to crimes in the state. Common Crime Defenses in Arizona

The Elements of a Criminal Defense

Alibi

It is submitted to prove innocence. To strengthen your defense, you have to show that you could not have committed the crime. For example, you may have been somewhere else when the crime was committed and even have been with another person who can vouch for you. If you were alone, you can still prove your alibi by presenting receipts or attendance sheets.  

Evidence

Aside from your alibi, you also have to present evidence or proof that you were not the one who committed the crime. Perhaps there is CCTV footage of you in an establishment or location far from where the crime took place.  

Testimonies and Witnesses

Witnesses are called to the stand to provide expert opinions or state what they saw. You can also give your own testimony or version of what happened. Then again, you have to consider this very carefully. Keep in mind that you may be charged with another crime if you take the stand and incriminate yourself. Your character may also be used against you by the prosecution.   Now that you have learned about the key elements of a criminal defense, you have to work with your attorney to figure out what would be the most suitable action for your case. If your attorney thinks that it is ideal for you to take the stand, he can help you prepare by having mock testimonies. This can help you practice and prepare answers to possible questions.  

Defenses Against DUI

The state of Arizona has stricter laws for DUI than any other state in the United States. This is why you need to get the help of an expert if you ever find yourself arrested for this crime. You need an attorney who can help you prove that you are not guilty of the following:
  1. Not being impaired to the slightest degree.
  2. Not being over the legal limit for alcohol.
  3. Not being in actual physical control of the vehicle
These are all defense to the criminal of DUI.  

Categories of Criminal Defense

In general, criminal defense has three categories: Affirmative, Procedural, and Negative.  

Negative Defense

This is when you rely on the lack or insufficiency of evidence to prove the truth of the allegation. For example, the prosecutor has to prove that you were:
  1. driving a motor vehicle
  2. under the influence of drugs or alcohol at the time of driving
  If the Prosecutor is not able to provide sufficient evidence to prove that you were driving a motor vehicle, then there is not enough evidence to make you guilty of DUI even if the prosecutor was able to prove that you were under the influence of drugs or alcohol.  

Affirmative Defense

It is the admission of the defendant that he committed the act that resulted in the criminal charges. Nonetheless, the defendant is still not guilty of the said charges due to a legal justification for the act. This means that there is a legal justification for the act of the defendant even though the allegation is true. Say, you admitted to killing your boss. However, you said that you only did it to protect yourself. As the defendant, you have to prove your affirmative defense once the criminal charges were proven by the prosecutor. Aside from self-defense, common affirmative defenses include entrapment, insanity, and intoxication.  

Procedural Defense

It does not exactly address the innocence or guilt of a defendant. Instead, it focuses on the defense or prosecution process. Examples of procedural defenses include requests to:
  1. lower prison sentences
  2. include or exclude evidence
  3. use defense expert witnesses
  4. plea bargains for a reduced sentence.
If you want to learn more about the elements and categories of criminal defense in Arizona, you can contact Robert A. Dodell, Attorney at Law, an attorney with more than thirty years of legal experience.

What Are the Common Crime Defenses in Arizona? is available on Dodell Law Offices

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Every American has a constitutional right to be present in court for criminal charges. So, if you have to face a judge, you should get an attorney to guide and help you. In addition, you must educate and familiarize yourself with regard to the common defenses to crimes in the state. Common Crime Defenses in Arizona

The Elements of a Criminal Defense

Alibi

It is submitted to prove innocence. To strengthen your defense, you have to show that you could not have committed the crime. For example, you may have been somewhere else when the crime was committed and even have been with another person who can vouch for you. If you were alone, you can still prove your alibi by presenting receipts or attendance sheets.  

Evidence

Aside from your alibi, you also have to present evidence or proof that you were not the one who committed the crime. Perhaps there is CCTV footage of you in an establishment or location far from where the crime took place.  

Testimonies and Witnesses

Witnesses are called to the stand to provide expert opinions or state what they saw. You can also give your own testimony or version of what happened. Then again, you have to consider this very carefully. Keep in mind that you may be charged with another crime if you take the stand and incriminate yourself. Your character may also be used against you by the prosecution.   Now that you have learned about the key elements of a criminal defense, you have to work with your attorney to figure out what would be the most suitable action for your case. If your attorney thinks that it is ideal for you to take the stand, he can help you prepare by having mock testimonies. This can help you practice and prepare answers to possible questions.  

Defenses Against DUI

The state of Arizona has stricter laws for DUI than any other state in the United States. This is why you need to get the help of an expert if you ever find yourself arrested for this crime. You need an attorney who can help you prove that you are not guilty of the following:
  1. Not being impaired to the slightest degree.
  2. Not being over the legal limit for alcohol.
  3. Not being in actual physical control of the vehicle
These are all defense to the criminal of DUI.  

Categories of Criminal Defense

In general, criminal defense has three categories: Affirmative, Procedural, and Negative.  

Negative Defense

This is when you rely on the lack or insufficiency of evidence to prove the truth of the allegation. For example, the prosecutor has to prove that you were:
  1. driving a motor vehicle
  2. under the influence of drugs or alcohol at the time of driving
  If the Prosecutor is not able to provide sufficient evidence to prove that you were driving a motor vehicle, then there is not enough evidence to make you guilty of DUI even if the prosecutor was able to prove that you were under the influence of drugs or alcohol.  

Affirmative Defense

It is the admission of the defendant that he committed the act that resulted in the criminal charges. Nonetheless, the defendant is still not guilty of the said charges due to a legal justification for the act. This means that there is a legal justification for the act of the defendant even though the allegation is true. Say, you admitted to killing your boss. However, you said that you only did it to protect yourself. As the defendant, you have to prove your affirmative defense once the criminal charges were proven by the prosecutor. Aside from self-defense, common affirmative defenses include entrapment, insanity, and intoxication.  

Procedural Defense

It does not exactly address the innocence or guilt of a defendant. Instead, it focuses on the defense or prosecution process. Examples of procedural defenses include requests to:
  1. lower prison sentences
  2. include or exclude evidence
  3. use defense expert witnesses
  4. plea bargains for a reduced sentence.
If you want to learn more about the elements and categories of criminal defense in Arizona, you can contact Robert A. Dodell, Attorney at Law, an attorney with more than thirty years of legal experience.

What Are the Common Crime Defenses in Arizona? is available on Dodell Law Offices

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Penalties for Possession of Drugs for Sale in Arizona https://www.azcrimlaw.com/criminal-legal-defense/drug-crimes/penalties-for-possession-of-drugs-for-sale-in-arizona/ Tue, 16 Apr 2019 10:10:33 +0000 https://www.azcrimlaw.com/?p=1419 In Arizona, you know you’re facing a serious felony if police officers arrest on charges of drug possession with the intention to sell or distribute. You can still be facing charges of possession with intent to sell even if they catch you with drugs for your personal use. This will depend on the configuration, quantity, and the presence of circumstantial evidence. A conviction can lead to some serious jail or prison time. With the help of a reputable criminal defence lawyer like Robert A. Dodell, Attorney At Law, you can challenge the felony charge in court. In some cases, police officers file a charge of intent to sell even if all the evidence and facts point to a lighter drug possession offense. A competent lawyer can dispute the charge, work to reduce it to a lighter offense that comes with less serious penalties.   Penalties for Possession of Drugs for Sale

Felony Drug Possession and Intent to Sell Laws in Arizona

In Arizona, there are 3 main categories of drugs. These are marijuana, narcotics, and dangerous drugs. Narcotics include heroin, cocaine, morphine, opium, and oxycodone, among others. Under dangerous drugs are substances such as steroids, ecstasy, LSD, methamphetamine, GHB, hallucinogenic mushrooms, clonazepam, mescaline, and lorazepam. To be arrested for possession with intent to distribute or sell, there must be enough amount of drugs in your possession. The volume that will determine whether or not the charge is appropriate is known as the statutory threshold amount. Following are some of the common threshold amounts:
  • Crack or Base Cocaine – 750 mg
  • Cocaine – 9 g
  • Methamphetamine – 9 g
  • PCP – 4 g
  • LSD – 50 dosage units or ½ ml
  • Heroin – 1 g
Even if you do not intend to sell, you can be charged with the felony if the amount of drugs caught in your possession exceeds the threshold.  

Possession of Dangerous Drugs for Sale

If you are carrying a substance that is classified under dangerous drugs, at a volume exceeding the substance’s threshold amount, you can face charges of possession of dangerous drugs with intent to sell. Under the Arizona drug laws, conviction for possession of dangerous drugs for sale carries a maximum jail sentence of 12.5 years if it is only your first felony conviction. It is a class 2 felony. Some dangerous drugs are under stricter sentencing guidelines. For example, you won’t be eligible for sentence suspension, parole, or probation if you’ve been arrested for possession of methamphetamine. This is under ARS 13-3407.  

Possession of Narcotics for Sale

You may be arrested for the felony if you are caught with narcotics in your possession that exceed the statutory threshold. A class 2 felony under ARS 13-3408, it carries a 12.5-year maximum prison sentence if it is only your first felony conviction.  

Other Possible Penalties for Intent to Sell Charges

If convicted for the crime of possessing dangerous drugs or narcotics for sale, and you’re placed under probation or your sentence has been suspended, you will be under numerous strict conditions. For one you will need to serve 360 hrs. of community service, at the minimum as one of the mandatory conditions for your probation. Considering the severity of the crime you are charged with, this can be seen as a good outcome. A reputable criminal defense lawyer can work to reduce your charges, and have your sentence suspended. Like you, your lawyer’s goal is to keep you from receiving a jail sentence. To do this, your attorney will challenge the prosecution. The prosecution will try to prove that all facts necessary for a conviction are present. You lawyer will work to throw out all evidence against you that were gathered in an illegal manner. Your constitutional rights protect you against unlawful search and seizure, and police officers have the tendency to push your rights to the limits.  

Final Word

The prospects of spending time in jail can be quite stressful and scary for anyone. If you or any of your loved ones is in such a predicament, contact Robert A. Dodell, Attorney At Law, to help you plan your next move. Together, you will go through all your available options. Arizona drug laws are among the toughest in the country. You will need a lawyer who knows all the challenges you are likely to face. Your freedom is at stake. Thus, you need to do everything you can to keep you out of jail.

The article Penalties for Possession of Drugs for Sale in Arizona See more on: call us – Robert Dodell Law Offices

Robert Dodell

10601 N Hayden Rd, #I-103

Scottsdale, AZ 85260

(480) 860-4321

https://goo.gl/maps/diwY4pu8X5m

]]>
In Arizona, you know you’re facing a serious felony if police officers arrest on charges of drug possession with the intention to sell or distribute. You can still be facing charges of possession with intent to sell even if they catch you with drugs for your personal use. This will depend on the configuration, quantity, and the presence of circumstantial evidence. A conviction can lead to some serious jail or prison time. With the help of a reputable criminal defence lawyer like Robert A. Dodell, Attorney At Law, you can challenge the felony charge in court. In some cases, police officers file a charge of intent to sell even if all the evidence and facts point to a lighter drug possession offense. A competent lawyer can dispute the charge, work to reduce it to a lighter offense that comes with less serious penalties.   Penalties for Possession of Drugs for Sale

Felony Drug Possession and Intent to Sell Laws in Arizona

In Arizona, there are 3 main categories of drugs. These are marijuana, narcotics, and dangerous drugs. Narcotics include heroin, cocaine, morphine, opium, and oxycodone, among others. Under dangerous drugs are substances such as steroids, ecstasy, LSD, methamphetamine, GHB, hallucinogenic mushrooms, clonazepam, mescaline, and lorazepam. To be arrested for possession with intent to distribute or sell, there must be enough amount of drugs in your possession. The volume that will determine whether or not the charge is appropriate is known as the statutory threshold amount. Following are some of the common threshold amounts:
  • Crack or Base Cocaine – 750 mg
  • Cocaine – 9 g
  • Methamphetamine – 9 g
  • PCP – 4 g
  • LSD – 50 dosage units or ½ ml
  • Heroin – 1 g
Even if you do not intend to sell, you can be charged with the felony if the amount of drugs caught in your possession exceeds the threshold.  

Possession of Dangerous Drugs for Sale

If you are carrying a substance that is classified under dangerous drugs, at a volume exceeding the substance’s threshold amount, you can face charges of possession of dangerous drugs with intent to sell. Under the Arizona drug laws, conviction for possession of dangerous drugs for sale carries a maximum jail sentence of 12.5 years if it is only your first felony conviction. It is a class 2 felony. Some dangerous drugs are under stricter sentencing guidelines. For example, you won’t be eligible for sentence suspension, parole, or probation if you’ve been arrested for possession of methamphetamine. This is under ARS 13-3407.  

Possession of Narcotics for Sale

You may be arrested for the felony if you are caught with narcotics in your possession that exceed the statutory threshold. A class 2 felony under ARS 13-3408, it carries a 12.5-year maximum prison sentence if it is only your first felony conviction.  

Other Possible Penalties for Intent to Sell Charges

If convicted for the crime of possessing dangerous drugs or narcotics for sale, and you’re placed under probation or your sentence has been suspended, you will be under numerous strict conditions. For one you will need to serve 360 hrs. of community service, at the minimum as one of the mandatory conditions for your probation. Considering the severity of the crime you are charged with, this can be seen as a good outcome. A reputable criminal defense lawyer can work to reduce your charges, and have your sentence suspended. Like you, your lawyer’s goal is to keep you from receiving a jail sentence. To do this, your attorney will challenge the prosecution. The prosecution will try to prove that all facts necessary for a conviction are present. You lawyer will work to throw out all evidence against you that were gathered in an illegal manner. Your constitutional rights protect you against unlawful search and seizure, and police officers have the tendency to push your rights to the limits.  

Final Word

The prospects of spending time in jail can be quite stressful and scary for anyone. If you or any of your loved ones is in such a predicament, contact Robert A. Dodell, Attorney At Law, to help you plan your next move. Together, you will go through all your available options. Arizona drug laws are among the toughest in the country. You will need a lawyer who knows all the challenges you are likely to face. Your freedom is at stake. Thus, you need to do everything you can to keep you out of jail.

The article Penalties for Possession of Drugs for Sale in Arizona See more on: call us – Robert Dodell Law Offices

Robert Dodell

10601 N Hayden Rd, #I-103

Scottsdale, AZ 85260

(480) 860-4321

https://goo.gl/maps/diwY4pu8X5m

]]>
Collateral DUI Consequences in Arizona https://www.azcrimlaw.com/dui-legal-defense/driving-under-the-influence-lawyer/collateral-dui-consequences-in-arizona/ Thu, 04 Apr 2019 10:10:32 +0000 https://www.azcrimlaw.com/?p=1415 In other states, you may be able to get away with DUI easily. However, things are different in Arizona. DUI charges are taken very seriously in this state. So, if you are found guilty on DUI charges, you can face dire repercussions, such as jail time, probation, and fines. You can also incur collateral consequences, which are additional penalties. In essence, drinking, driving, and being caught can literally ruin your life. It is better to stay on the safe side and refrain from drinking and driving. DUI Consequences

What Are Collateral Consequences Exactly?

First-time offenders are usually granted a misdemeanor, and are able to reduce their collateral consequences. Nevertheless, they can still suffer short-term inconveniences. Those who have been convicted with a DUI are likely to be charged higher insurance rates or have their fingerprint clearance cards taken away. Aside from jail time, probation, and fines, your driver’s license can also be suspended for up to a year. Then, when your license has been restored, you have to install an ignition-interlock system in your vehicle. This system could remain in place for at least eighteen months. With the ignition-interlock system on your dashboard, you will be forced to blow into a tube to determine if you have consumed alcohol before you can start your vehicle. Your vehicle will not start if alcohol is detected. Also, you can have a really hard time getting anywhere if you don’t have your driver’s license. You’ll have to carpool or take public transportation to work, assuming that it’s even available, and you’ll be forced to carry around grocery bags, since you can’t put them in your car. If you have children, you may have to ask your spouse or a neighbor to drive them to school. Your expenses are also likely to escalate, since you may be required to undergo alcohol counseling. The more hours you spend in counseling, the more money you’ll have to spend.  

How DUI Destroys Careers?

If the above given consequences already sound horrible, you’ll need to prepare yourself for the worst. Being convicted of a DUI not only costs you money, but it can cost you your career as well. Your livelihood can be severely affected if your job involves driving a school bus or a commercial vehicle. If you drive for a delivery company, you may have to transfer to another location. Even worse, if you can’t transfer or the company doesn’t think it’s worth it, you may lose your job. The same thing happens to people in similar industries who are found guilty of a DUI. In some instances, employers could also take action against employees with DUI charges. Have you ever heard of the case of Steve Keim, the Arizona Cardinals General Manager? He was found guilty of DUI, so he was fined $200,000 and suspended for over a month by his employer. Your employer may no longer trust you and decide to minimize your role. Although this sounds unfair, it is actually legal. Hence, you cannot really take it above your boss, hoping to have their decision overturned. After all, it was your fault that you were arrested for DUI. Likewise, if you are a nurse or a teacher, your collateral consequences are generally worse than the general public. Fortunately, there are ways to minimize them. You just need to find an attorney who can help you.  

Getting an Attorney

It is not advisable to represent yourself, especially if you do not have any legal background or training. You need a lawyer who can guide your case and defend your rights, as well as minimize your penalties. If your attorney is very good, you may even get your charges dropped. In the State of Arizona, Robert A. Dodell is one of the best attorneys at law. He offers personal legal services in a variety of areas, including DUI. You can rest assured that he will dedicate his time to helping you win your case. So, if you ever find yourself in this sticky situation, call the office and set up an appointment for an initial consultation. He offers free case evaluation. With more than three decades of legal experience, Robert A. Dodell is the man for the job. You want a lawyer who has the experience and expertise to assist you in your DUI case, and to get you your driver’s license back as soon as possible.

Collateral DUI Consequences in Arizona is republished from Robert Dodell Law Offices

AzCrimLaw - Robert A. Dowell, Attorney at law

10601 N Hayden Rd, #I-103

Scottsdale, AZ 85260

(480) 860-4321

https://goo.gl/maps/diwY4pu8X5m

]]>
In other states, you may be able to get away with DUI easily. However, things are different in Arizona. DUI charges are taken very seriously in this state. So, if you are found guilty on DUI charges, you can face dire repercussions, such as jail time, probation, and fines. You can also incur collateral consequences, which are additional penalties. In essence, drinking, driving, and being caught can literally ruin your life. It is better to stay on the safe side and refrain from drinking and driving. DUI Consequences

What Are Collateral Consequences Exactly?

First-time offenders are usually granted a misdemeanor, and are able to reduce their collateral consequences. Nevertheless, they can still suffer short-term inconveniences. Those who have been convicted with a DUI are likely to be charged higher insurance rates or have their fingerprint clearance cards taken away. Aside from jail time, probation, and fines, your driver’s license can also be suspended for up to a year. Then, when your license has been restored, you have to install an ignition-interlock system in your vehicle. This system could remain in place for at least eighteen months. With the ignition-interlock system on your dashboard, you will be forced to blow into a tube to determine if you have consumed alcohol before you can start your vehicle. Your vehicle will not start if alcohol is detected. Also, you can have a really hard time getting anywhere if you don’t have your driver’s license. You’ll have to carpool or take public transportation to work, assuming that it’s even available, and you’ll be forced to carry around grocery bags, since you can’t put them in your car. If you have children, you may have to ask your spouse or a neighbor to drive them to school. Your expenses are also likely to escalate, since you may be required to undergo alcohol counseling. The more hours you spend in counseling, the more money you’ll have to spend.  

How DUI Destroys Careers?

If the above given consequences already sound horrible, you’ll need to prepare yourself for the worst. Being convicted of a DUI not only costs you money, but it can cost you your career as well. Your livelihood can be severely affected if your job involves driving a school bus or a commercial vehicle. If you drive for a delivery company, you may have to transfer to another location. Even worse, if you can’t transfer or the company doesn’t think it’s worth it, you may lose your job. The same thing happens to people in similar industries who are found guilty of a DUI. In some instances, employers could also take action against employees with DUI charges. Have you ever heard of the case of Steve Keim, the Arizona Cardinals General Manager? He was found guilty of DUI, so he was fined $200,000 and suspended for over a month by his employer. Your employer may no longer trust you and decide to minimize your role. Although this sounds unfair, it is actually legal. Hence, you cannot really take it above your boss, hoping to have their decision overturned. After all, it was your fault that you were arrested for DUI. Likewise, if you are a nurse or a teacher, your collateral consequences are generally worse than the general public. Fortunately, there are ways to minimize them. You just need to find an attorney who can help you.  

Getting an Attorney

It is not advisable to represent yourself, especially if you do not have any legal background or training. You need a lawyer who can guide your case and defend your rights, as well as minimize your penalties. If your attorney is very good, you may even get your charges dropped. In the State of Arizona, Robert A. Dodell is one of the best attorneys at law. He offers personal legal services in a variety of areas, including DUI. You can rest assured that he will dedicate his time to helping you win your case. So, if you ever find yourself in this sticky situation, call the office and set up an appointment for an initial consultation. He offers free case evaluation. With more than three decades of legal experience, Robert A. Dodell is the man for the job. You want a lawyer who has the experience and expertise to assist you in your DUI case, and to get you your driver’s license back as soon as possible.

Collateral DUI Consequences in Arizona is republished from Robert Dodell Law Offices

AzCrimLaw - Robert A. Dowell, Attorney at law

10601 N Hayden Rd, #I-103

Scottsdale, AZ 85260

(480) 860-4321

https://goo.gl/maps/diwY4pu8X5m

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Is Threatening Someone a Crime in Arizona? https://www.azcrimlaw.com/criminal-legal-defense/threatening-or-intimidating/is-threatening-someone-a-crime-in-arizona/ Tue, 26 Mar 2019 10:10:26 +0000 https://www.azcrimlaw.com/?p=1344

In Arizona What is a Threatening or Intimidating Crime?

It is a crime to intimidate or threaten violence under Arizona’s Threatening or Intimidating Statute; it is also illegal to threaten serious damage to property. Under ARS 13-1202, threatening or intimidating is a serious offense that’s charged either as a felony, depending on the circumstances. With the charge, there does not have to be physical contact to the alleged property or victim. The victim simply has to report a genuine threat. Threatening or intimidating does not even require that the victim experienced any fear. Threatening or intimidating cases typically arise from uncorroborated claims from biased victims. The allegation of threat may even be  made up, blown out of proportion, or simply exaggerated. The victim may report the charge out of frustration, vindication, or anger as opposed to a genuine concern for property or safety. Under ARS 13-1202(A)(1), threatening or intimidating is typically charged as a Class 1 misdemeanor. It can be charged as a Class 6 felony in some rare cases when it is alleged that the threat was made in retaliation to a victim reporting criminal conduct  Threatening or intimidating can also be charged as a a Class 6 felony when it involves criminal street gangs. It can be charged under ARS 13-1202(A)(3) as a Class 3 felony if made to promote the gang or to get a person to participate in gang activities. The threatening and intimidating charge, however, is most common in domestic abuse cases and those are typically filed as misdemeanors. Threatening or Intimidating Criminal Defense

Penalties for Threatening or Intimidating Under Arizona Law

Misdemeanor Threatening or Intimidating

Threatening or intimidating is charged as a Class 1 misdemeanor where the person committing the offense, either by word or conduct, threatens to cause physical injury to another person or serious damage to another’s property.  The threat is also a Class 1 misdemeanor where the person causes, or in reckless disregard to causing, serious public inconvenience including, but not limited to, evacuation of a building, place of assembly or transportation facility.  A Class 1 misdemeanor carries up to a 6-month jail term, $4500 in fines and surcharges, as well as up to 3 years of probation. If it is charged as a domestic abuse offense, the defendant may lose their gun rights and be required to take mandatory domestic violence classes.

Felony Threatening or Intimidating

Threatening or intimidating can be charged as a Class 6 felony if the alleged threat or intimidation is made in retaliation to the reporting of a crime, such as in a domestic violence or assault situation. It carries up to a 2-year prison sentence on a first offense. The most serious penalties are in Class 3 felony cases. On a first offense, the defendant may face a prison sentence of up to 8.75 years.  

Potential Defenses to Threatening or Intimidating Charges

No Threat Was Actually Made

Charges may be fabricated at times, particularly in domestic violence cases. Anger, blame shifting, vengeance, custody, divorce, and cheating are some of the most common motivators in most cases. Drugs and alcohol can also lead to distorted or exaggerated claims.

It Was Not a Genuine Threat

The State is not necessarily required to demonstrate that the defendant acted with wrongful intent, had the ability to actually carry out the threat, or planned to carry out the threat, but it still has to prove a “threat” was communicated.

The Alleged Threat Is Not Criminal

A huge difference exists between criminal conduct and rude/offensive behavior. Arizona criminalizes behavior that involves violence, fighting, and genuine threats. However, it does not label people as criminals because they lack control/ respect or they act rude/offensive.

Self-Defense

In Arizona, people are allowed to threaten physical force if it seems reasonably necessary to protect against the attempted or actual use of unlawful physical force. Threatening and intimidation is mostly justified when facing physical force to deter that violence.

1st Amendment Rights

The 1st and 4th Amendments of the United States Constitution protect free speech. However, free speech is not absolute. “Fighting words” are not permitted under the law. Fighting words are those likely to provoke a violent reaction in regular people. Crude/vulgar language might be protected under the law, but fighting words are not. Is threatening someone a crime in Arizona? Yes, it is, and it depends on the circumstances. If in doubt, it is always advisable to consult a criminal defense lawyer to make your case. If you find yourself facing threatening and intimidating charges, get in touch with an experienced lawyer to help with your defense.    

Is Threatening Someone a Crime in Arizona? was originally published to robert a dodell, attorney at law

Robert A. Dodell, Attorney at Law

10601 N Hayden Rd, #I-103

Scottsdale, AZ 85260

(480) 860-4321

https://goo.gl/maps/diwY4pu8X5m

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In Arizona What is a Threatening or Intimidating Crime?

It is a crime to intimidate or threaten violence under Arizona’s Threatening or Intimidating Statute; it is also illegal to threaten serious damage to property. Under ARS 13-1202, threatening or intimidating is a serious offense that’s charged either as a felony, depending on the circumstances. With the charge, there does not have to be physical contact to the alleged property or victim. The victim simply has to report a genuine threat. Threatening or intimidating does not even require that the victim experienced any fear. Threatening or intimidating cases typically arise from uncorroborated claims from biased victims. The allegation of threat may even be  made up, blown out of proportion, or simply exaggerated. The victim may report the charge out of frustration, vindication, or anger as opposed to a genuine concern for property or safety. Under ARS 13-1202(A)(1), threatening or intimidating is typically charged as a Class 1 misdemeanor. It can be charged as a Class 6 felony in some rare cases when it is alleged that the threat was made in retaliation to a victim reporting criminal conduct  Threatening or intimidating can also be charged as a a Class 6 felony when it involves criminal street gangs. It can be charged under ARS 13-1202(A)(3) as a Class 3 felony if made to promote the gang or to get a person to participate in gang activities. The threatening and intimidating charge, however, is most common in domestic abuse cases and those are typically filed as misdemeanors. Threatening or Intimidating Criminal Defense

Penalties for Threatening or Intimidating Under Arizona Law

Misdemeanor Threatening or Intimidating

Threatening or intimidating is charged as a Class 1 misdemeanor where the person committing the offense, either by word or conduct, threatens to cause physical injury to another person or serious damage to another’s property.  The threat is also a Class 1 misdemeanor where the person causes, or in reckless disregard to causing, serious public inconvenience including, but not limited to, evacuation of a building, place of assembly or transportation facility.  A Class 1 misdemeanor carries up to a 6-month jail term, $4500 in fines and surcharges, as well as up to 3 years of probation. If it is charged as a domestic abuse offense, the defendant may lose their gun rights and be required to take mandatory domestic violence classes.

Felony Threatening or Intimidating

Threatening or intimidating can be charged as a Class 6 felony if the alleged threat or intimidation is made in retaliation to the reporting of a crime, such as in a domestic violence or assault situation. It carries up to a 2-year prison sentence on a first offense. The most serious penalties are in Class 3 felony cases. On a first offense, the defendant may face a prison sentence of up to 8.75 years.  

Potential Defenses to Threatening or Intimidating Charges

No Threat Was Actually Made

Charges may be fabricated at times, particularly in domestic violence cases. Anger, blame shifting, vengeance, custody, divorce, and cheating are some of the most common motivators in most cases. Drugs and alcohol can also lead to distorted or exaggerated claims.

It Was Not a Genuine Threat

The State is not necessarily required to demonstrate that the defendant acted with wrongful intent, had the ability to actually carry out the threat, or planned to carry out the threat, but it still has to prove a “threat” was communicated.

The Alleged Threat Is Not Criminal

A huge difference exists between criminal conduct and rude/offensive behavior. Arizona criminalizes behavior that involves violence, fighting, and genuine threats. However, it does not label people as criminals because they lack control/ respect or they act rude/offensive.

Self-Defense

In Arizona, people are allowed to threaten physical force if it seems reasonably necessary to protect against the attempted or actual use of unlawful physical force. Threatening and intimidation is mostly justified when facing physical force to deter that violence.

1st Amendment Rights

The 1st and 4th Amendments of the United States Constitution protect free speech. However, free speech is not absolute. “Fighting words” are not permitted under the law. Fighting words are those likely to provoke a violent reaction in regular people. Crude/vulgar language might be protected under the law, but fighting words are not. Is threatening someone a crime in Arizona? Yes, it is, and it depends on the circumstances. If in doubt, it is always advisable to consult a criminal defense lawyer to make your case. If you find yourself facing threatening and intimidating charges, get in touch with an experienced lawyer to help with your defense.    

Is Threatening Someone a Crime in Arizona? was originally published to robert a dodell, attorney at law

Robert A. Dodell, Attorney at Law

10601 N Hayden Rd, #I-103

Scottsdale, AZ 85260

(480) 860-4321

https://goo.gl/maps/diwY4pu8X5m

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